Ali Hasni's Blog

i found a google whack

Posted in Public, Random, Technology by Ali on February 22, 2010

well,, it’s not going to remain for a long time since i am telling you the keyword and many more people are going to write about it and then the the keyword will have many more links to it…

well the climax is that the keyword is “angda punda”

it’s a google whack,,, when you google it,, it returns just one result..

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The Creator’s Creation

Posted in Public, Random by Ali on February 21, 2010

If Allah helps you, none can overcome you; and if He forsakes you, who is there after Him that can help you? And in Allah (Alone) let believers put their trust. (Surah Al-e-Imran, 3:160)

Fabi Ayyi Aala-i Rabbikuma Tukazziban (So, Oh Jinn and Mankind) Which of the Favors of your RABB (Lord) will you then deny? (Surah Rahman, 55:13)

Please read the fascinating facts and favors we take for granted.

Our heart beats around 100, 000 times every day. Our blood is on a 60,000 mile journey.

Our body has about 5.6 liters (6 quarts) of blood. This 5.6 liters of blood circulates through the body three times every minute. A drop of blood contains 250 million cells.

It takes about 20 seconds for a red blood cell to circle the whole body. The average red blood cell lives for 120 days. Platelets, which are one of the constituents of the blood is produced at the rate of 200 billion per day.

There are 2.5 trillion (give or take) of red blood cells in our body at any moment. To maintain this number, about 2.5 million new ones need to be produced every second by our bone marrow or we give birth to 100 billion red blood cells every day.

Our eyes can distinguish up to one million color surfaces and take in more information than the largest telescope known to man.

Our lungs inhale over two million liters of air every day, without even thinking. They are large enough to cover a tennis court.

Our hearing is so sensitive it can distinguish between hundreds of thousands of different sounds.

Our sense of touch is more refined than any device ever created.

Our brain is more complex than the most powerful computer and has over 100 billion nerve cells.

Considering all the tissues and cells in our body, 25 million new cells are being produced each second. That’s a little less than the population of Canada – every second!

When we touch something, we send a message to our brain at 124 mph.

We have over 600 muscles. We exercise at least 30 muscles when we smile.

We are about 70 percent water. We make one liter of saliva a day.

Our nose is our personal air-conditioning system: It warms cold air, cools hot air and filters impurities.

In one square inch of our hand we have nine feet of blood vessels, 600 pain sensors, 9000 nerve endings, 36 heat sensors and 75 pressure sensors.

We have copper, zinc, cobalt, calcium, manganese, phosphates, nickel and silicon in our bodies.

The amount of carbon in the human body is enough to fill about 9,000 ‘lead’ pencils.

One square inch of human skin contains 625 sweat glands. The human skin contains 280,000 heat receptors.

There are 137 million light sensitive cells in the eye’s retina and the fluid that fills the eye is changed 15 times a day.

Our eyes never grow, and our nose and ears never stop growing. The muscles of the eye move more than 100,000 times a day. Every hour, the human eye can process 36,000 bits of information.

Humans have the ability to distinguish 4,000 to 10,000 smells.

You breathe in about 7 quarts of air every minute. Good! Air is cost free.

The human skull is made up of 29 different bones and the human hand has 27 bones.

Our Brain has over 100 billion nerve cells. There are about 13, 500,00 neurons in the human spinal cord.

The length of human blood vessel is such that it circles the globe two and half times.

Human kidneys have about 1 million nephrons that filters out liquids and wastes.

The human liver performs 500 different functions.

REMEMBER TO WORSHIP THE CREATOR, NOT HIS CREATIONS.

Don’t miss even a single word… Too good

Posted in Public, Random by Ali on February 18, 2010

An atheist professor of philosophy speaks to his class on the problem science has with God, The Almighty.

He asks one of his new students to stand and…..

Prof: So you believe in God?
Student: Absolutely, sir.

Prof: Is God good?
Student: Sure.

Prof: Is God all-powerful?
Student: Yes.

Prof: My brother died of cancer even though he prayed to God to heal him. Most of us would attempt to help others who are ill. But God didn’t. How is this God good then? Hmm!
(Student is silent.)

Prof: You can’t answer, can you? Let’s start again, young fellow. Is God good?
Student: Yes.

Prof: Is Satan good?
Student: No.

Prof: Where does Satan come from?
Student: From…God…..

Prof: That’s right. Tell me son, is there evil in this world?
Student: Yes.

Prof: Evil is everywhere, isn’t it? And God did make everything. Correct?
Student: Yes.

Prof: So who created evil?
(Student does not answer.)

Prof: Is there sickness, Immorality, Hatred, Ugliness?
All these terrible things exist in the world, don’t they?
Student: Yes, sir.

Prof: So, who created them?
(Student has no answer.)

Prof: Science says you have 5 senses you use to identify and observe the world around you.
Tell me, son…Have you ever seen God?
Student: No, sir.

Prof: Tell us if you have ever heard your God?
Student: No, sir.

Prof: Have you ever felt your God, tasted your God, smelt your God?
Have you ever had any sensory perception of God for that matter?
Student: No, sir. I’m afraid I haven’t.

Prof: Yet you still believe in Him?
Student: Yes.

Prof: According to empirical, testable, demonstrable protocol, science says your GOD doesn’t exist. What do you say to that, son?
Student: Nothing. I only have my faith.

Prof: Yes, Faith. And that is the problem science has.
Student: Professor, is there such a thing as heat?

Prof: Yes.
Student: And is there such a thing as cold?

Prof: Yes.
Student: No sir. There isn’t. (The lecture theatre becomes very quiet with this turn of events.)

Student: Sir, you can have lots of heat, even more heat, superheat, mega heat, white heat, a little heat or no heat. But we don’t have anything called cold. We can hit 458 degrees below zero which is no heat, but we can’t go any further after that. There is no such thing as cold. Cold is only a word we use to describe the absence of heat. We cannot measure cold. Heat is energy. Cold is not the opposite of heat, sir, just the absence of it.
(There is pin-drop silence in the lecture theatre.)

Student: What about darkness, Professor? such a thing as darkness Is there?

Prof: Yes. What is night if there isn’t darkness?
Student: You’re wrong again, sir. Darkness is the absence of something. You can have low light, normal light, bright light, flashing light….But if you have no light constantly, you have nothing and its called darkness, isn’t it? In reality, darkness isn’t. If it were you would be able to make darkness darker, wouldn’t you?

Prof: So what is the point you are making, young man?
Student: Sir, my point is your philosophical premise is flawed.

Prof: Flawed? Can you explain how?
Student: Sir, you are working on the premise of duality. You argue there is life and then there is death, a good God and a bad God. You are viewing the concept of God as something finite, something we can measure. Sir, science can’t even explain a thought. It uses electricity and magnetism, but has never seen, much less fully understood either one. To view death as the opposite of life is to be ignorant of the fact that death cannot exist as a substantive thing. Death is not the opposite of life: just the absence of it.
Now tell me, Professor. Do you teach your students that they evolved from a monkey?

Prof: If you are referring to the natural evolutionary process, yes, of course, I do.
Student: Have you ever observed evolution with your own eyes, sir?
(The Professor shakes his head with a smile, beginning to realize where the argument is going.)

Student: Since no one has ever observed the process of evolution at work and cannot even prove that this process is an on-going endeavor, are you not teaching your opinion, sir? Are you not a scientist but a preacher? (The class is in uproar.)

Student: Is there anyone in the class who has ever seen the Professor’s brain?
(The class breaks out into laughter.)

Student: Is there anyone here who has ever heard the Professor’s brain, felt it, touched or smelt it? No one appears to have done so. So, according to the established rules of empirical, stable, demonstrable protocol, science says that you have no brain, sir. With all due respect, sir, how do we then trust your lectures, sir?
(The room is silent. The professor stares at the student, his face unfathomable.)

Prof: I guess you’ll have to take them on faith, son.
Student: That is it sir…. The link between man & god is FAITH. That is all that keeps things moving & alive.

This is a true story, and the student was none other than….
APJ Abdul Kalam ,
The former President of India…

Pranav Mistry is the MAN !!!

Posted in 1 by Ali on February 14, 2010

if you think like me,,, that iPad is something doing to change the world… Think Again!!
It’s Pranav Mistry and His Sixth Sense ,,, which is the NEW** to bring down stocks from the Wall Streets..

Apple Goes Down,,, Microsoft Goes Down,, Google Also Goes Down,,, >>> It’s an Indian…
and I am proud… Cheers to Pranav Mistry….

you think i am fool…. log on to http://www.pranavmistry.com/projects/sixthsense/
and know more about the guy on pranavmistry.com

i’ll go crazy

Google Buzz Kills

Posted in Public, Technology by Ali on February 13, 2010

In every form of conversations we have on the web there is always one person who kills the conversations – Buzz let’s you be that person but only after you have set everyone else up for the fall.

Remembrance of death

Posted in Public, Random by Ali on February 13, 2010

Often the Holy Quran severely criticises those who do not believe in the Day of Judgement. At times we find it condemning those who believe in the Day, but are negligent of it. Therefore, traditions emphasise the visitation of graves, so that man may remember death. In our daily prayers, we recite, Arabic ‘Master of the Day of Judgment’ a number of times, so that our attention is turned towards the ‘Day of Judgment.’

A major portion of our supplications are devoted to discussion on death and the Day of Judgement, so that man may wake up from the slumber of negligence.

If we ponder over reality, we learn that the world deceives the one who craves for it. On the other hand, the one who is attentive towards death and whose heart is aware of the Hereafter, does not fall for the lure of death. One who keeps death in front of his eyes and awaits for it, not only performs his routine tasks sincerely, but constantly strives to do more actions which becomes the cause of Allah’s satisfaction. He is aware that death can overtake him at any moment and he does not have time on his side.

The Holy Prophet (s.a.w.s.) says,

‘Surely the heart rusts like iron.’ People inquired, ‘How can it be polished?’ He (s.a.w.s.) said, ‘By remembering death and with the recitation of Quran.’

(Nahjul Fasahah)

So let us from today resolve to remember death at all times and perform all our actions with that thought in our minds. Let us collect deeds for our hereafter and make piety and abstinence our constant companions.

Source: al-muntazar ezine

Google’s gone Crazy

Posted in Public, Technology by Ali on February 11, 2010

Google want’s everything… from the handsets you use to the computer browser, operating system, email everything…

Now after making initial attempts to enter the social networking market by acquiring orkut.. It has yet made another attempt… and this time it is going to get it right.. It has taken the perfect steps for things to fall in the perfect place…

Google Buzz is here.. and It’s competition time for Twitter, Facebook and all of em… because this is re-inventing the social network.. The smart move is that it’s integrated in Gmail,, so it already has millions of users in it’s database by default, unless someone has opted out of it.

So if Google Wave is the Future, Buzz is going to be the Present.

What more is Google trying to do, It just want’s to be in your life somehow.. The crazy people from who wish to index the world data, be it in any form -just announced that it plans to build trial ultra high-speed broadband networks in select parts of the country.

This could be great news for consumers, especially in Google’s test markets. The company promises connection speeds of “100 times faster than what most Americans have access to today.” Users could potentially enjoy download speeds from the network at 1 gigabit per second, though of course at that speed, the limiting factor would usually be elsewhere, like your hard drive or CPU.

The benefit for Google: More bandwidth so you can use more Google services, faster, including streaming hi-def videos from YouTube to multiple devices, more Web apps, search, etc.

Mark His Words!

Posted in Public, Technology by Ali on February 10, 2010

Steve Jobs held a town hall meeting with Apple employees late last week following the iPad launch. Wired reports on what was said at the meeting by Steve Jobs. Two of the biggest topics included Google and Adobe.

On Google, Jobs confirms the much-reported competition between the two companies.
On Google: We did not enter the search business, Jobs said. They entered the phone business. Make no mistake they want to kill the iPhone. We won’t let them, he says.

As for Adobe, Jobs said they are lazy and Jobs blames Adobe for a buggy implementation of Flash on the Mac as one of the reasons they won’t support it.
Apple does not support Flash because it is so buggy, he says. Whenever a Mac crashes more often than not it’s because of Flash. No one will be using Flash, he says. The world is moving to HTML5.

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TCS website hacked

Posted in Public, Technology by Ali on February 9, 2010

India’s largest information technology services company, Tata Consultancy Services (TCS), has become the latest target of hackers. The company has restored its website, after hackers changed its domain name and put it up for sale.

When asked, a spokesperson said: “The TCS website, http://www.tcs.com, was disrupted. Subsequently, it has been restored and is functioning fine. None of the servers were compromised. Initial investigation reveals a DNS (Domain Name Server) redirection at the domain name registrar’s end. Further investigations are on.”

The hackers changed the domain name to 205.178.152.154 from 216.15.200.140, re-pointing the name server (NS) records of the company’s website. The hacker had also put up a whos.among.us widget to display how many people were on the site at any given point. The hackers, according to a report, also provided an email id, abed_uk@hotmail.com.

The hackers not only attacked the website but also allegedly changed its domain name and put it for sale.

While this incident has raised questions about the level of security preparedness the country’s largest IT company has, experts think otherwise. “I am not at all surprised. This can happen with anyone. This certainly does not mean that the company is not giving better services to its customers. When you have signed a business deal with someone, you will give 100 per cent delivery. But, this is about a company that has probably not taken enough measures to keep its security up to date,” said a head of a security agency who did not wish to be quoted.

BS Reporter / Mumbai February 9, 2010, 0:36 IST

Racial Profiling >>matter of grave concern

Posted in Public, Random by Ali on February 6, 2010

Editor’s note: Nafees A. Syed, a senior at Harvard University majoring in government, is an editorial editor at The Harvard Crimson as well as a senior editor and columnist for the Harvard-MIT journal on Islam and society, Ascent. She is chairwoman of the Harvard Institute of Politics Policy Group on Racial Profiling.

(CNN) — It seems that now someone called “Barack Hussein Obama” can be pulled aside and patted down merely because of his name. But while our president has the benefit of Air Force One, millions of us with a “funny name” (Muslim and otherwise) do not. Like me.

I’ve consistently faced “random” selections for extra screening at the airport after I decided to wear the hijab, or Muslim head covering. I’ve been told to take my head scarf off or have my head probed while the passengers in front of me offered pitying smiles as they rushed to their flights.

One time, the woman in front of me had a hairdo that could pose more of a security threat than any head scarf could. Muslim women wear the hijab as a symbol of modesty, to be judged not by their appearance.
The Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. dreamed that people would be judged for “the content of their character.” However, the Transportation Security Administration is judging me and other Muslims by the way we look.
The TSA uses the hijab to profile Muslim women, and passengers can now expect a full-body pat-down, an appallingly invasive “enhanced pat-down search that could include the chest and groin, or a planned “mind-scan” that would track people’s reaction to terrorist symbols. What’s next, palm reading?

At an airport with a full body scanner, I can have the image of my body displayed before a stranger — virtual nudity. Do they seriously have a blank check on our bodies? Of course I care about profiling partly because I’m affected. But does one have to face this issue to feel that it’s wrong? After all, it is difficult to imagine ourselves in other people’s shoes when we don’t have to.

It’s hard for me too. Especially over the past month, I’ve been shocked at the comments about my faith, and the sometimes-prejudiced support for racial profiling. Radio host Mike Gallagher said, “There should be a separate line to scrutinize anybody with the name Abdul or Ahmed or Mohammed.” Sorry Paula Abdul and Muhammad Ali, or anyone with the world’s most common name, Muhammad.

For people who aren’t affected by racial profiling at airports, imagine this: The TSA implements a new rule to counter drunken driving, which kills over 13,000 Americans every year. People who are not Muslim have to go through a Breathalyzer test before they can enter their vehicle. Muslims don’t drink alcohol and are, therefore, exempt. Ridiculous? I agree.

I know that what I am going through is just the tip of the iceberg of racial profiling in our country. Thirty-two million Americans report that they have been the victims of racial profiling. Racial profiling violates the U.S. Constitution, is ineffective and trickles down to the workplace, schools and elsewhere.

You also run into problems when you justify profiling nearly one in every four people in the world. There are Muslims of every possible race, making profiling practically futile. Fareed Zakaria said it best: “When you’re trying to find a needle in a haystack, adding hay does not help you.”

Putting ethical and pragmatic reasons aside, it’s hard to justify not caring. Even if racial profiling doesn’t affect us, it affects our friends, family members, co-workers, doctors, television personalities — the list goes on. There are some people who don’t know Muslims and are numb to realizing the effects of profiling. Therein lies the problem.

According to the Pew Research Center, people who know Muslims are less likely to have negative views of them. Co-existence is a dismal possibility unless people go to the source to find out about Islam, not skewed Web sites.

And Muslims, here’s something to think about: If your knowledge of Islam came from common stereotypes, wouldn’t you also be misinformed about the faith and its followers? The Quran says, “[God has] made you into nations and tribes, so that you might come to know one another (49:13).” So get to know your fellow Americans.

There are some Americans who think Muslims are terrorists and some Muslims who think that other Americans are willfully ignorant. Neither group deserves such a label. Psychologist Henri Tajfel, who was a Holocaust survivor, explained how we isolate ourselves into an “in-group” and facilitate discrimination of an “out-group.”
Religious profiling boxes Muslims into a category separate from Americans. We can’t accept that distinction. Let’s all think outside of the box.

It’s essential for U.S. security that airport screening be done. But we need to stop the inflation of procedures that make our society more afraid and less secure. The TSA needs to stop and evaluate methods that are more effective, less invasive, and don’t discriminate based on religion or race.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Nafees A. Syed.